Increased Precautions We're Taking in Response to the Coronavirus.
As updates on the impact of the coronavirus continue to be released, we want to take a moment to inform you of the heightened preventative measures we have put in place at Sierra by the Sea to keep our patients/clients/guests, their families, and our employees safe. All efforts are guided by and in adherence to the recommendations distributed by the CDC.

Please note that for the safety of our patients, their families, and our staff, visitation is no longer allowed at Sierra by the Sea.

  • This restriction has been implemented in compliance with updated corporate and state regulations to further reduce the risks associated with COVID-19.
  • Alternate methods of communication, including telehealth, are being vetted and may be offered when deemed clinically appropriate.

For specific information regarding these changes and limitations, please contact us directly.

CDC updates are consistently monitored to ensure that all guidance followed is based on the latest information released.

  • All staff has received infection prevention and control training.
  • Thorough disinfection and hygiene guidance has been provided.
  • Patient care supplies such as masks and hand sanitizer are being monitored and utilized.
  • Cleaning service contracts have been reviewed for additional support.
  • Personal protective equipment items are routinely checked to ensure proper and secure storage.
  • Screening protocols have been enhanced.
  • CDC informational posters are on display to provide important reminders on proper infection prevention procedures.
  • We are in communication with our local health department to receive important community-specific updates.

The safety of our patients, their families, and our employees is our top priority, and we will remain steadfast in our efforts to reduce any risk associated with COVID-19.

The CDC has provided a list of easy tips that can help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue and then immediately dispose of the tissue.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.

For detailed information on COVID-19, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Salvia: The Legal Hallucinogenic Drug

Many homeowners are familiar with salvia as an easy-to-grow flowering plant.

What is less well known is that salvia divinorum, one of the 700 species of the plant, is a powerful hallucinogenic that is being used by many teenagers and young adults.  The herb, which is commonly known by the names “Magic Mint” and “Sally D,” is legal in most states.  It is widely available on the Internet and in many tobacco stores, head shops and stores that sell herbal medicines.

Salvia Divinorum: Not Safe – Psychologically Risky

Salvia divinorum is common to southern Mexico, Central America and South America, where native populations have used it for spiritual ceremonies for centuries.  Traditionally, the leaves of the herb were chewed but today they are more often dried and then smoked.  The use of salvia is on the rise, possibly because of its legal status and easy availability.  The Internet has also contributed to its growing popularity by spreading the word about its effects.

The drug was recently in the news when it was revealed that Tucson massacre suspect Jared Loughner was known to use salvia on a regular basis.  Several weeks ago, pop singer and former Disney Channel television star Miley Cyrus was captured on video smoking from a bong which contained what she claimed to be salvia.  Her father released the following statement on Twitter following circulation of the video, “Sorry guys. I had no idea. Just saw this stuff for the first time myself. Im so sad [sic]. There is much beyond my control right now.”

Salvia is characterized by an intense high that comes on quickly.  Unlike long-lasting chemical hallucinogens like LSD, the effects of salvia wear off in 30 minutes or less.  While it lasts, the high is described by many as disorienting rather than pleasurable.  Hallucinations and delusions that mimic psychosis are often part of salvia’s high.  People who have smoked salvia are unable to interact with their surroundings, leading to concerns about drivers who are under the influence of the herb.

A 2009 survey by the National Institute on Drug Abuse found that 5.7 percent of high school seniors reported using salvia within the past year, a higher percentage than those who admitted to using ecstasy. One death has been attributed to salvia divinorum.  The story of 16-year-old Brett Chidester has been covered in the media and was recently the focus of a segment on ABC’s Nightline.  The gifted student committed suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning after experimenting with saliva.  His parents have successfully campaigned to have salvia outlawed in their home state of Delaware and continue to campaign for national statutes against the herb.

Currently there are no studies available on the short and long term effects of salvia divinorum on the brain.  There has also been no research on safe dosage levels.  Because the drug has only recently become popular in America, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency has not yet listed it as a controlled substance.  However, it is listed as a drug of concern and may soon be classified as a Schedule I drug similar to marijuana or LSD.

Recovery is fueled by hope and courage and an exploration of the underlying factors such as trauma. Our treatment driven by compassionate and trauma-informed care provides the foundation of recovery and healing.

– Valerie M. Kading, DNP, MBA, MSN, PMHNP-BC, Chief Executive Officer
Marks of Quality Care
These accreditations are an official recognition of our dedication to providing treatment that exceeds the standards and best practices of quality care.
  • American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)
  • California Consortium of Addiction Programs and Professionals (CCAPP)
  • Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF)