Increased Precautions We're Taking in Response to COVID-19
As updates on the impact of the coronavirus continue to be released, we want to take a moment to inform you of the heightened preventative measures we have put in place at Sierra by the Sea to keep our patients, their families, and our employees safe. All efforts are guided by and in adherence to the recommendations distributed by the CDC.

Please note that for the safety of our patients, their families, and our staff, on-site visitation is no longer allowed at Sierra by the Sea.

  • This restriction has been implemented in compliance with updated corporate and state regulations to further reduce the risks associated with COVID-19.
  • We are offering visitation through telehealth services so that our patients can remain connected to their loved ones.
  • Alternate methods of communication for other services are being vetted and may be offered when deemed clinically appropriate.

For specific information regarding these changes and limitations, please contact us directly.

CDC updates are consistently monitored to ensure that all guidance followed is based on the latest information released.

  • All staff has received infection prevention and control training.
  • Thorough disinfection and hygiene guidance has been provided.
  • Patient care supplies such as masks and hand sanitizer are being monitored and utilized.
  • Temperature and symptom screening protocols are in place for all patients and staff.
  • Social distancing strategies have been implemented to ensure that patients and staff maintain proper distance from one another at all times.
  • Cleaning service contracts have been reviewed for additional support.
  • Personal protective equipment items are routinely checked to ensure proper and secure storage.
  • CDC informational posters are on display to provide important reminders on proper infection prevention procedures.
  • We are in communication with our local health department to receive important community-specific updates.

The safety of our patients, their families, and our employees is our top priority, and we will remain steadfast in our efforts to reduce any risk associated with COVID-19.

The CDC has provided a list of easy tips that can help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue and then immediately dispose of the tissue.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.

For detailed information on COVID-19, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Privacy and Prescription Drug Abuse

In one of the most startling statistical reports to come out of Washington and the national media, Time Magazine (mobile version) carried an Associated Press story on 15 October 2010 stating that in 2007, more than 27,000 deaths were reported nation-wide by prescription drug overdoses

Mark Twain wrote that there are three kinds of lies: Lies, damn lies, and statistics. Thus, one can reasonably wonder how many similar deaths go unnoticed and/or unreported.

The Time story cited a plan that will be funded by federal money beginning in 2011 to link interstate pharmacy data allowing pharmacies, police agencies, and physicians to check “suspicious” prescription medication patterns. If a patient’s record is flagged, physicians must decide whether or not to prescribe a controlled substance for the patient. This proposed action follows on the heels of an even more frightening national statistic as verified by White House sources: From 2008 through 2010, hospitalizations stemming in some way from prescription drug abuse rose at least 400 percent. That’s four HUNDRED percent, folks! What’s going on in America that would cause such a jump in ER visits and acute hospital care?

The story may go something like this:

Pearl is a middle-aged woman who lives in Miami with her adult, widowed daughter during the winter and in northern Nebraska in the warmer months where her husband works a large wheat farm. She suffers from the chronic pain of herniated disks in her back. Pearl is also physically and emotionally addicted to opiate pain medication. To prove her residency in Florida and Nebraska to write checks and obtain services, she obtained drivers’ licenses in both states unbeknownst to DMV authorities. (One usually has to surrender one state license in order to obtain a license in another state,) Pearl has a physician in Miami, whom she sees during her winter forays into Florida to escape the cold Nebraska winters. She also has a physician in the rural Nebraska town where she spends summers with her husband. These two physicians don’t communicate with each other because of confidentiality issues and Pearl, being an opiate addict, likes it this way. She regularly receives prescriptions for OxyContin, the Fentanyl patch, Ambien for insomnia and Valium for muscle relaxation. One dark and stormy night, Pearl mixes her codeine-based cough syrup with a bit too much of her opiates and benzodiazepines. Her respirations and heartbeat stop during her sleep and Pearl becomes another statistic of an accidental death stemming from prescription drug addiction and abuse that could have been prevented, perhaps, if her physicians and pharmacies had been on speaking terms with each other – either literally or electronically.

Civil liberties organizations and health information privacy advocates are opposed to the implementation of database sharing procedures. Others opposing any such notification system include Penny Cowan, founder of the American Chronic Pain Association, who fears that it may discourage those who legitimately need painkillers from seeking help out of the fear of being labeled as a “drug seeker” and summarily denied emergency or acute care. “What we never hear about,” Cowan told the AP, “is how people with pain who, because they take these medications, are able to function, to be a productive part of society.”

Never mind what’s in your wallet. What’s in your state’s pharmaceutical data base; who sees it, when, and why? Did you give consent to share information about your prescriptions? Would you give such consent if, by limiting your personal privacy, you could help prevent deadly drug overdoses?

The times, they are a-changin’ and you will soon need to answer these questions for your state lawmakers.

Pearl is a middle-aged woman who lives in Miami with her adult, widowed daughter during the winter and in northern Nebraska in the warmer months where her husband works a large wheat farm. She suffers from the chronic pain of herniated disks in her back. Pearl is also physically and emotionally addicted to opiate pain medication. To prove her residency in Florida and Nebraska to write checks and obtain services, she obtained drivers’ licenses in both states unbeknownst to DMV authorities. (One usually has to surrender one state license in order to obtain a license in another state,) Pearl has a physician in Miami, whom she sees during her winter forays into Florida to escape the cold Nebraska winters. She also has a physician in the rural Nebraska town where she spends summers with her husband. These two physicians don’t communicate with each other because of confidentiality issues and Pearl, being an opiate addict, likes it this way. She regularly receives prescriptions for OxyContin, the Fentanyl patch, Ambien for insomnia and Valium for muscle relaxation. One dark and stormy night, Pearl mixes her codeine-based cough syrup with a bit too much of her opiates and benzodiazepines. Her respirations and heartbeat stop during her sleep and Pearl becomes another statistic of an accidental death stemming from prescription drug addiction and abuse that could have been prevented, perhaps, if her physicians and pharmacies had been on speaking terms with each other – either literally or electronically.

Civil liberties organizations and health information privacy advocates are opposed to the implementation of database sharing procedures. Others opposing any such notification system include Penny Cowan, founder of the American Chronic Pain Association, who fears that it may discourage those who legitimately need painkillers from seeking help out of the fear of being labeled as a “drug seeker” and summarily denied emergency or acute care. “What we never hear about,” Cowan told the AP, “is how people with pain who, because they take these medications, are able to function, to be a productive part of society.”

Never mind what’s in your wallet. What’s in your state’s pharmaceutical data base; who sees it, when, and why? Did you give consent to share information about your prescriptions? Would you give such consent if, by limiting your personal privacy, you could help prevent deadly drug overdoses?

We Accept Insurance
The following are some of the providers with whom we work regularly
  • Cigna
  • Optum
  • and many more...

Recovery is fueled by hope and courage and an exploration of the underlying factors such as trauma. Our treatment driven by compassionate and trauma-informed care provides the foundation of recovery and healing.

– Valerie M. Kading, DNP, MBA, MSN, PMHNP-BC, Chief Executive Officer
Marks of Quality Care
These accreditations are an official recognition of our dedication to providing treatment that exceeds the standards and best practices of quality care.
  • American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)
  • California Consortium of Addiction Programs and Professionals (CCAPP)
  • Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF)